Does a healthy worker effect explain the “allergy protection” at Bavarian farms?

Unfortunately most studies in the farming environment did not report the prevalence of parental history nor did they report the effect size of parental risk in the farming population. This is, however, a critical issue as the so called healthy worker effect HEW may be a rather trivial explanation of the results.

Specifically, it is a sampling bias: the kind of subjects that voluntarily enroll in a clinical trial and actually follow the experimental regimen are not representative of the general population. They can be expected, on average, to be healthier as they are concerned for their health [or as ill people already dropped out]

At least Braun-Fahrländer 1999 reported that allergic parents were seen much less at farms: allergic rhinitis 12.7% versus 29.4% (P=0.001). A history of allergy therefore is no more a risk factor as it is in the general population.

Leynaert 2001 showed only a slightly reduced prevalence of “allergy” (39.1% vs 41.5%, NS) while her table 4 is most interesting. The association started only after year 1960 which points towards misclassification as far as the analysis is not stratified by year of birth.

Remes 2002 showed a dose dependent effect decline between farming (36.2%) and controls (31.6%, P=0.075),

Perkin 2006 also found some significant lower prevalence in farmers 47.3% versus 57.7%, P<0.001.

A HWE is therefore likely.

In total, I found indeed six studies (Thelin 1994, Braback 2006, Chenard 2007, Thaon 2011, Elholm 2013 and Spierenburg 2015) that examined in detail a possible relationship of HWE, allergy and farming. Unfortunately the examination period in five of these studies is too short for any conclusion with Braback 2006 being the only reliable study.

Also from this study, we can safely conclude, that there is a significant HWE.